Gay-Lussac’s law examples

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Gay-Lussac’s law, also known as the pressure-temperature law, states that the pressure of a fixed amount of gas at a constant volume is directly proportional to its absolute temperature. In other words, as the temperature of a gas increases, so does its pressure, and vice versa, provided that the volume of the gas remains constant.

Examples

Gas cylinder

Gay-Lussac's law example - gas cylinder
Increasing temperature of pressurized gas increases its pressure, as per Gay-Lussac’s law | Image: Stock photo, unknown source[●]

When a gas cylinder is pressurized, the gas molecules are tightly packed together and have a certain temperature. According to Gay-Lussac’s law, the pressure of a gas increases with an increase in temperature, assuming the volume remains constant. If the gas cylinder is heated, the temperature of the gas inside will increase and cause an increase in pressure. If the pressure becomes too high, it can lead to an explosion, which is why it’s important to handle pressurized gas cylinders with care.

Pressure cooker

Gay-Lussac's law example - pressure cooker
As per Gay-Lussac’s law, heating water inside a pressure cooker increases its pressure and consequently raises its boiling point | Image: Stock photo, unknown source[●]

The temperature and pressure inside a pressure cooker are directly related, as per Gay-Lussac’s law. As the temperature rises, the pressure inside the cooker also increases. This higher pressure leads to a higher boiling point of the water, allowing food to cook faster.

Bullet

Gay-Lussac's law example - bullet
Firing a bullet increases pressure due to rapidly expanding gases from high temperature, per Gay-Lussac’s law | Image: Stock photo, unknown source[●]

When a bullet is fired from a gun, the gunpowder inside the bullet casing is ignited, producing a large amount of gas. As per Gay-Lussac’s law, the pressure of the gas is directly proportional to its temperature. Therefore, the high temperature of the gas produced by the gunpowder increases the pressure inside the bullet casing, propelling the bullet out of the gun barrel.

Tire tube

Gay-Lussac's law example - tire tube
Hot air inside the tube increases pressure, causing the tire to expand or burst, as per Gay-Lussac’s law | Image: Stock photo, unknown source[●]

When a vehicle is driven, the friction between the tire and the road generates heat. This heat is transferred to the air inside the tire, increasing its temperature. As per Gay-Lussac’s law, the pressure of the gas inside the tire increases with temperature. Therefore, the pressure inside the tire also increases, which can lead to overinflation or a blowout if the pressure becomes too high.

Heater filament

Gay-Lussac's law example - heater filament
Hot water in a filament increases steam pressure, following Gay-Lussac’s law | Image: Stock photo, unknown source[●]

In a water heater, the electric filament heats up the water. As the temperature of the water increases, the pressure of the steam generated by the hot water also increases. According to Gay-Lussac’s law, the pressure of the gas is directly proportional to its temperature, so the pressure inside the water heater increases. If the pressure becomes too high, it can cause an explosion.

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  • The stock photos used in this post are sourced from platforms like Pexels, Pixabay, Canva, etc. Due to the age of the images, their specific origins remain unknown.

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Deep

Learnool.com was founded by Deep Rana, who is a mechanical engineer by profession and a blogger by passion. He has a good conceptual knowledge on different educational topics and he provides the same on this website. He loves to learn something new everyday and believes that the best utilization of free time is developing a new skill.

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