Block (periodic table)

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Block periodic table
Blocks in periodic table | Image: Learnool

A block in the periodic table refers to a group of elements that exhibit similar chemical and physical properties based on their electron configurations. The arrangement of the periodic table is based on the increasing atomic number and electron configuration of the elements, with rows representing periods and columns representing groups. The periodic table is divided into four blocks, namely s-block, p-block, d-block, and f-block, which correspond to specific regions of the periodic table where electrons are filled in the s, p, d, and f subshells. The s-block elements have their outermost electrons in the s-subshell, while the p-block elements have their outermost electrons in the p-subshell, and so on.

The names of these blocks are based on the spectroscopic notation of an electron’s azimuthal quantum number, with sharp (s), principal (p), diffuse (d), and fundamental (f) representing values 0, 1, 2, and 3, respectively. The elements within each block share similar electron configurations and exhibit similar chemical and physical properties. However, the g-block, with its potential elements, has not yet been observed, although the letter “g” was chosen for its name as it follows the alphabetical order after f. Understanding the arrangement of blocks in the periodic table is important for predicting the properties and behaviors of elements, as well as for identifying the trends in their properties, such as atomic radius, ionization energy, electronegativity, and chemical reactivity, across the periodic table.

The concept of blocks in the periodic table was first proposed by French spectroscopist Charles Janet in 1928. Janet’s work was based on the understanding that the order in which atomic orbitals are filled with electrons determines the chemical and physical properties of the element. He proposed the division of the periodic table into blocks to reflect this arrangement. Although the block concept was initially met with resistance from some quarters, it has since become an essential tool for understanding the trends in the properties and reactivity of elements across the periodic table. Janet’s contribution to the development of the periodic table continues to be recognized and celebrated in the scientific community.

On periodic table

group 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18
period
1 1
H
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Hydrogen
2
He
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Helium
2 3
Li
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Lithium
4
Be
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Beryllium
5
B
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Boron
6
C
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Carbon
7
N
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Nitrogen
8
O
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Oxygen
9
F
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Fluorine
10
Ne
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Neon
3 11
Na
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Sodium
12
Mg
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Magnesium
13
Al
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Aluminium
14
Si
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Silicon
15
P
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Phosphorus
16
S
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Sulfur
17
Cl
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Chlorine
18
Ar
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Argon
4 19
K
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Potassium
20
Ca
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Calcium
21
Sc
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Scandium
22
Ti
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Titanium
23
V
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Vanadium
24
Cr
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Chromium
25
Mn
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Manganese
26
Fe
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Iron
27
Co
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Cobalt
28
Ni
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Nickel
29
Cu
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Copper
30
Zn
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Zinc
31
Ga
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Gallium
32
Ge
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Germanium
33
As
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Arsenic
34
Se
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Selenium
35
Br
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Bromine
36
Kr
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Krypton
5 37
Rb
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Rubidium
38
Sr
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Strontium
39
Y
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Yttrium
40
Zr
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Zirconium
41
Nb
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Niobium
42
Mo
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Molybdenum
43
Tc
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Technetium
44
Ru
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Ruthenium
45
Rh
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Rhodium
46
Pd
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Palladium
47
Ag
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Silver
48
Cd
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Cadmium
49
In
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Indium
50
Sn
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Tin
51
Sb
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Antimony
52
Te
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Tellurium
53
I
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Iodine
54
Xe
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Xenon
6 55
Cs
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Caesium
56
Ba
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Barium
72
Hf
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Hafnium
73
Ta
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Tantalum
74
W
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Tungsten
75
Re
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Rhenium
76
Os
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Osmium
77
Ir
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Iridium
78
Pt
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Platinum
79
Au
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Gold
80
Hg
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Mercury
81
Tl
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Thallium
82
Pb
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Lead
83
Bi
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Bismuth
84
Po
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Polonium
85
At
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Astatine
86
Rn
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Radon
7 87
Fr
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Francium
88
Ra
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Radium
104
Rf
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Rutherfordium
105
Db
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Dubnium
106
Sg
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Seaborgium
107
Bh
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Bohrium
108
Hs
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Hassium
109
Mt
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Meitnerium
110
Ds
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Darmstadtium
111
Rg
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Roentgenium
112
Cn
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Copernicium
113
Nh
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Nihonium
114
Fl
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Flerovium
115
Mc
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Moscovium
116
Lv
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Livermorium
117
Ts
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Tennessine
118
Og
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Oganesson
57
La
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Lanthanum
58
Ce
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Cerium
59
Pr
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Praseodymium
60
Nd
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Neodymium
61
Pm
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Promethium
62
Sm
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Samarium
63
Eu
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Europium
64
Gd
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Gadolinium
65
Tb
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Terbium
66
Dy
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Dysprosium
67
Ho
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Holmium
68
Er
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Erbium
69
Tm
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Thulium
70
Yb
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Ytterbium
71
Lu
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Lutetium
89
Ac
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Actinium
90
Th
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Thorium
91
Pa
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Protactinium
92
U
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Uranium
93
Np
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Neptunium
94
Pu
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Plutonium
95
Am
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Americium
96
Cm
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Curium
97
Bk
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Berkelium
98
Cf
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Californium
99
Es
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Einsteinium
100
Fm
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Fermium
101
Md
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Mendelevium
102
No
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Nobelium
103
Lr
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Lawrencium
block
– s block – p block
– d block – f block

The periodic table is divided into four blocks: s, p, d, and f. The s-block contains 14 elements, the p-block contains 36 elements, the d-block contains 40 elements, and the f-block contains 28 elements.

s-block

s-block
s-block | Image: Learnool

The s-block is a region of the periodic table containing elements from the first two groups (columns) of the periodic table, which are the alkali metals and alkaline earth metals, as well as the nonmetals hydrogen and helium. These elements have two s electrons in their outermost electron shell, which is the s-subshell. They are called the “s-block elements” because the outermost electrons are in s-orbitals.

The s-block elements are highly reactive and tend to form ionic compounds with nonmetals. The alkali metals in group 1 have a single outer s electron, making them the most reactive metals in the periodic table. They have low melting and boiling points and are soft enough to be easily cut with a knife. Alkaline earth metals in group 2 have two outer s electrons and are less reactive than the alkali metals. They have higher melting and boiling points and are harder than the alkali metals. The s-block elements are used in a variety of applications such as in batteries, construction materials, and the production of fertilizers. For instance, calcium is commonly used in the production of cement for construction, and lithium-ion batteries use lithium as a key component.

p-block

p-block
p-block | Image: Learnool

The p-block is the region of the periodic table that includes six columns, groups 13 to 18, and contains 36 elements, making it the second-largest block. Elements in the p-block have their outermost electrons in the p-subshell, which can hold a maximum of six electrons. The valence electrons in p-block elements participate in a wide range of chemical reactions, making these elements crucial to many aspects of chemistry and materials science. Helium is also in group 18 but is not considered part of the p-block, as it has only two electrons in its outermost s-subshell.

The p-block elements include some of the most important and abundant elements in nature, such as carbon, nitrogen, and oxygen. These elements form the backbone of many organic compounds, which are essential to life. In addition, the p-block includes elements with diverse properties, ranging from the noble gases, which are generally unreactive, to the highly reactive halogens and chalcogens. The p-block also includes some important metals, such as aluminum and tin, as well as nonmetals like sulfur and selenium. The properties of p-block elements are influenced by factors such as electronegativity, atomic size, and ionization energy, which change in predictable ways across the block.

In addition to the main-group elements in the p-block, there are also some elements known as the poor metals or metalloids included in the p-block. These elements (boron, silicon, germanium, arsenic, antimony, and tellurium) have some properties of metals and some properties of nonmetals, and their placement in the periodic table has been a topic of debate among chemists.

The p-block elements have a variety of uses in industry and technology. For example, carbon, the basis of organic chemistry, is a p-block element found in all living organisms. Nitrogen, another p-block element, is used in the production of fertilizers, while oxygen is essential for respiration and combustion. The halogens, which are also p-block elements, have a range of uses in disinfectants, bleaches, and other chemicals. Finally, the noble gases in the p-block have low reactivity and are used in applications such as lighting, welding, and as cryogens.

d-block

d-block
d-block | Image: Learnool

The d-block, also called the transition metals, is located in the center of the periodic table and includes 40 elements spanning 10 columns or groups, from group 3 to group 12. These elements have their outermost electrons in the d-subshell, which can hold up to 10 electrons. The d-block elements have many unique properties, including high melting and boiling points, multiple oxidation states, and the ability to form complex ions and compounds.

The transition metals in the d-block are used in a wide range of applications, from construction materials to electronics. Iron, the most common transition metal, is used in the production of steel, while copper is an important electrical conductor. Other d-block elements like titanium, vanadium, and chromium are used in alloys to improve properties like strength and corrosion resistance.

The d-block elements also play important roles in biological systems, with several transition metals being essential micronutrients. Iron is a key component of hemoglobin, which carries oxygen in the blood, while copper is involved in various enzyme reactions. The d-block elements have also been studied for their potential in catalyzing chemical reactions, particularly in industrial processes.

The unique properties of the d-block elements are largely due to their partially filled d-orbitals, which allow for a variety of bonding arrangements and complex coordination geometries. As a result, these elements have diverse chemistry and exhibit a wide range of physical and chemical properties. Understanding the behavior of the d-block elements is crucial to many areas of chemistry and materials science.

f-block

f-block
f-block | Image: Learnool

The f-block, also known as the inner transition metals, is a section of the periodic table that includes the lanthanide and actinide series of elements. These elements are located beneath the d-block and placed at the bottom of the periodic table, and they do not belong to any specific group. The lanthanide series consists of elements 57 to 71, while the actinide series includes elements 89 to 103. Lutetium and lawrencium, despite being lanthanides and actinides, are not included in the f-block because they have a filled f shell, which distinguishes them from the other elements in their respective series.

The f-block elements have unique electron configurations, with their valence electrons occupying the f-subshell. Because of the shielding effect of the inner electrons, the outermost electrons in f-block elements are relatively isolated from the rest of the atom, giving rise to some unusual properties. For example, many f-block elements have high melting and boiling points, as well as magnetic and electrical properties.

The lanthanides and actinides are often referred to as rare-earth elements, but this name can be misleading, as some of these elements are actually quite abundant. However, they are typically found in low concentrations in the Earth’s crust and can be difficult to extract and purify. The f-block elements have a wide range of uses, including in magnets, batteries, and nuclear reactors. Some f-block elements also have important applications in medicine and imaging, such as gadolinium-based contrast agents used in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI).

g-block

The g-block is a theoretical extension of the periodic table of elements beyond the f-block. It is predicted to occur after the superactinides, elements beyond the actinides in the periodic table. The g-block is also known as the “extended periodic table” or the “hypothetical g-block.”

There is currently no experimental evidence for the existence of elements in the g-block, and their properties are largely unknown. The g-block is of interest to theoretical chemists and physicists who study the electronic structure and chemical properties of hypothetical elements in this region of the periodic table. While the g-block is not a formally recognized region of the periodic table, it represents an area of active research and speculation in the field of theoretical chemistry.

Properties

The elements in the s-block have one or two valence electrons, which are held relatively close to the nucleus. As a result, s-block elements tend to have low ionization energies and electronegativities, making them good reducing agents. The alkali metals (group 1) are highly reactive and tend to form ionic compounds with nonmetals, while the alkaline earth metals (group 2) are less reactive and tend to form ionic compounds with oxygen and other chalcogens.

The p-block elements display diverse chemical properties due to the differing numbers of valence electrons they have. Group 14-18 consists of nonmetals that are generally brittle and have low melting and boiling points, while groups 13-16 comprise soft metals that also have low melting and boiling points. The metalloids in groups 13-17 have intermediate properties and can display characteristics of both metals and nonmetals, depending on the specific conditions.

Elements in the d-block are characterized by having valence electrons in the d-subshell, which can accommodate up to 10 electrons. This unique electron configuration results in d-block elements often having high melting and boiling points, high densities, and strong thermal and electrical conductivity. The transition metals found in groups 3-12 of the periodic table are typically known for being hard, dense, and strong, and they often form brightly colored compounds due to the presence of partially filled d-orbitals.

The f-block elements have valence electrons in the f-subshell, which can hold up to 14 electrons. Due to their unique electronic configuration, these elements have a wide range of properties, with many displaying notable magnetic and optical behavior. The lanthanides are generally soft, silvery metals that are often used as catalysts in various chemical reactions, while the actinides are predominantly radioactive and have numerous nuclear and chemical applications.

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Learnool.com was founded by Deep Rana, who is a mechanical engineer by profession and a blogger by passion. He has a good conceptual knowledge on different educational topics and he provides the same on this website. He loves to learn something new everyday and believes that the best utilization of free time is developing a new skill.

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